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1. Buche - Beech * Fagus sylvatica, the European beech or common beech, is a deciduous tree belonging to the beech family Fagaceae.
2.Birke - Birch * Birch is a broadleaved deciduous hardwood tree of the genus Betula (/'b?tj?l?/),[2] in the family Betulaceae, which also includes alders, hazels, and hornbeams, and is closely related to the beech/oak family, Fagaceae. 
3.Esche - Ash * Fraxinus excelsior — known as the ash, or European ash or common ash to distinguish it from other types of ash — is a species of Fraxinus native to most of Europe from Portugal to Russia, with the exception of northern Scandinavia and southern Iberia.
4.Eiche - Oak * An oak is a tree or shrub in the genus Quercus (/'kw?rk?s/;[1] Latin "oak tree") of the beech family, Fagaceae. There are approximately 600 extant species of oaks.
5.Ulme - Elm * Elms are deciduous and semi-deciduous trees comprising the genus Ulmus in the plant family Ulmaceae. 
6.Kiefer -Pine * Pines are conifer trees in the genus Pinus /'pi?nu?s/,[1] in the family Pinaceae. They are the only genus in the subfamily Pinoideae. Counting varieties and subspecies, the plant list of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and Missouri Botanical Garden accepts 175 names of pines as current, together with some thirty or forty unresolved and many more synonyms or misapplied.
7. Pappel - Populus * Populus is a genus of 25–35 species of deciduous flowering plants in the family Salicaceae, native to most of the Northern Hemisphere. English names variously applied to different species include poplar /'p?p.l?r/, aspen, and cottonwood.
8. Tanne - Fir * Firs (Abies) are a genus of 48–56 species of evergreen coniferous trees in the family Pinaceae. They are found through much of North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and North Africa, occurring in mountains over most of the range. Firs are most closely related to the genus Cedrus (cedar). Douglas firs are not true firs, being of the genus Pseudotsuga.
9. Wacholder - Juniper * Junipers are coniferous plants in the genus Juniperus /d?u?'n?p?r?s/[1] of the cypress family Cupressaceae. Depending on taxonomic viewpoint, between 50 and 67 species of juniper are widely distributed throughout the Northern Hemisphere, from the Arctic, south to tropical Africa in the Old World, and to the mountains of Central America.
10. Eibe - Taxus * Taxus is a genus of small coniferous trees or shrubs in the yew family Taxaceae. They are relatively slow-growing and can be very long-lived, and reach heights of 1–40 m, with trunk diameters of up to 5 m.[1] They have reddish bark, lanceolate, flat, dark-green leaves 1–4 cm long and 2–3 mm broad, arranged spirally on the stem, but with the leaf bases twisted to align the leaves in two flat rows either side of the stem.[2]
11. Gemeine Fichte - Picea abies * Picea abies, the Norway spruce,[2] is a species of spruce native to Central and Eastern Europe. It grows up to 55 m (180 ft) tall, and bears needles 12–24 mm (0.47–0.94 in) long and cones 9–17 cm (3.5–6.7 in) long. It is very closely related to the Siberian spruce, Picea obovata, which replaces it east of the Ural Mountains, and with which it hybridises freely. Picea abies is widely planted for its wood, and is the species used as the main Christmas tree in several cities around the world. It was the first gymnosperm to have its genome sequenced, and one clone has been measured as 9,550 years old.
12. Linde - Tilia * Tilia is a genus of about 30 species of trees native throughout most of the temperate Northern Hemisphere. Commonly called lime trees in the British Isles, they are not closely related to the lime fruit. Other names include linden and basswood. The genus occurs in Europe and eastern North America, but the greatest species diversity is found in Asia. Under the Cronquist classification system, this genus was placed in the family Tiliaceae, but genetic research summarized by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group has resulted in the incorporation of this genus into the Malvaceae.
13. Eberesche - Sorbus aucuparia * Sorbus aucuparia, more commonly called rowan and mountain-ash (although the latter name may be used for several other unrelated trees), is a species of deciduous tree or shrub in the rose family. It is a highly variable species, and botanists have used different definitions of the species to include or exclude trees native to certain areas; a recent definition[1] includes trees native to most of Europe and parts of Asia, as well as northern Africa. The range extends from Madeira and Iceland to Russia and northern China. Unlike many plants with similar distributions, it is not native to Japan.[1]
14. Haselnußstrauch - Corylus avellana * Corylus avellana, the common hazel, is a species of hazel native to Europe and western Asia, from the British Isles south to Iberia, Greece, Turkey and Cyprus, north to central Scandinavia, and east to the central Ural Mountains, the Caucasus, and northwestern Iran.[2][3][4] It is an important component of the hedgerows that were the traditional field boundaries in lowland England. The wood was traditionally grown as coppice, the poles cut being used for wattle-and-daub building and agricultural fencing.
15. Walnuß - Juglans * The Walnut tree or Juglans is a plant genus of the family Juglandaceae, the seeds of which are known as walnuts. They are deciduous trees, 10–40 metres (33–131 ft) tall, with pinnate leaves 200–900 millimetres (7.9–35.4 in), with 5–25 leaflets; the shoots have chambered pith, a character shared with the wingnuts (Pterocarya), but not the hickories (Carya) in the same family.
The 21 species in the genus range across the north temperate Old World from southeast Europe east to Japan, and more widely in the New World from southeast Canada west to California and south to Argentina.
The common name walnut derives from Old English wealhhnutu, literally 'foreign nut' (from wealh 'foreign' + hnutu 'nut'),[1] because it was introduced from Gaul and Italy.[2] The Latin name for the walnut was nux Gallica, "Gallic nut".
The genus name "Juglans" comes from Latin juglans, meaning 'walnut, walnut tree'; juglans in turn is a contraction of Jovis glans, 'nut of [the god] Jupiter'.[3][4]
16.Weißdorn - Crataegus * Crataegus /kr?'ti?g?s/,[3] commonly called hawthorn, thornapple,[4] May-tree,[5] whitethorn,[5] or hawberry, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the family Rosaceae, native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Europe, Asia and North America. The name "hawthorn" was originally applied to the species native to northern Europe, especially the common hawthorn C. monogyna, and the unmodified name is often so used in Britain and Ireland. The name is now also applied to the entire genus and to the related Asian genus Rhaphiolepis. The name haw, originally an Old English term for hedge, applies to the fruit.[6]
17. Holzapfel - Malus sylvestris * Malus sylvestris, the European crab apple, is a species of the genus Malus, native to Europe. Its scientific name means "forest apple", and the truly wild tree has thorns.
18. Wildbirne - Pyrus pyraster (syn. Pyrus communis subsp. pyraster), also called European Wild Pear, is a species of pear belonging to the Rosaceae family.
19. Vogel-Kirsche - Prunus avium * Prunus avium, commonly called wild cherry,[2] sweet cherry,[2] bird cherry,[2] or gean,[2] is a species of cherry native to Europe, Anatolia, Maghreb, and western Asia, from the British Isles[3] south to Morocco and Tunisia, north to the Trondheimsfjord region in Norway and east to the Caucasus and northern Iran, with a small disjunct population in the western Himalaya.[4][5] This species, in the rose family (Rosaceae), has a diploid set of sixteen chromosomes (2n = 16).[6] All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides.
20. Zwetzschge - The zwetschge (/'tsv?t?g?/) (Prunus domestica subsp. domestica) is a fruit-bearing tree, or its fruit. It is a subspecies of the plum Prunus domestica.[1] The freestone fruit is similar to, but distinct from, the clingstone damson (Prunus domestica subsp. insititia)[2] and is especially popular in Central Europe.
21. Pflaume - Prunus domestica (sometimes referred to as Prunus × domestica) is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. A deciduous tree, it includes many varieties of the fruit trees known as plums in English, though not all plums belong to this species. The greengages and damsons also belong to subspecies of P. domestica.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
22. Schlehdorn - Prunus spinosa (blackthorn, or sloe) is a species of Prunus native to Europe, western Asia, and locally in northwest Africa.[2][3] It is also locally naturalised in New Zealand and eastern North America.[3]
The specific name spinosa is a Latin term indicating the pointed and thornlike spur shoots characteristic of this species.
The common name "blackthorn" is due to the thorny nature of the shrub, and its very dark bark.
The word commonly used for the fruit, "sloe" comes from Old English slah. The same word is noted in Middle Low German, historically spoken in Lower Saxony, Middle Dutch sleuuwe or, contracted form, sle, from which come Modern Low German words: sle, sli, and Modern Dutch slee, Old High German sleha", "slewa, from which come Modern German Schlehe and Danish slåen.
The names related to 'sloe' come from the Common Germanic root *slai?won. Cf. West Slavic / Polish sliwa; plum of any species, including sloe sliwa tarnina—root present in other Slavic languages, e.g. Croatian/Serbian šljiva / ?????.
The expression "sloe-eyed" for a person with dark eyes comes from the fruit, and is first attested in A. J. Wilson's 1867 novel Vashti.[4]
23. Erle - Alder is the common name of a genus of flowering plants (Alnus) belonging to the birch family Betulaceae. The genus comprises about 30 species of monoecious trees and shrubs, a few reaching a large size, distributed throughout the north temperate zone with a few species extending into Central America and the northern Andes.[1]
24. Platane - Platanus /ˈplætənəs/[1] is a genus comprising a small number of tree species native to the Northern Hemisphere. They are the sole living members of the family Platanaceae.
25. Holunder - Sambucus (elder or elderberry) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Adoxaceae. It was formerly placed in the honeysuckle family, Caprifoliaceae, but was reclassified due to genetic evidence. It contains between 5 and 30 species of deciduous shrubs, small trees and herbaceous perennial plants.
26. Weide - Willows, also called sallows, and osiers, form the genus Salix, around 400 species[2] of deciduous trees and shrubs, found primarily on moist soils in cold and temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere. Most species are known as willow, but some narrow-leaved shrub species are called osier, and some broader-leaved species are referred to as sallow (from Old English sealh, related to the Latin word salix, willow). Some willows (particularly arctic and alpine species) are low-growing or creeping shrubs; for example, the dwarf willow (Salix herbacea) rarely exceeds 6 cm (2.4 in) in height, though it spreads widely across the ground.
27. Traubenkirsche - Prunus padus, known as Bird Cherry or Hackberry, is a species of cherry, native to northern Europe and northern Asia. It is a deciduous small tree or large shrub, 8–16 m tall, which grows south of the Arctic Circle in northern Britain and Ireland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, Russia and Ukraine. There are also some trees in France, Spain, Portugal and in the Balkans. It is the type species of the subgenus Padus, which have flowers in racemes.
28. Schneeball - Viburnum opulus (common name guelder-rose[1]) is a species of flowering plant in the family Adoxaceae (formerly Caprifoliaceae) native to Europe, northern Africa and central Asia.[2]
The common name 'guelder rose' relates to the Dutch province of Gelderland, where a popular cultivar, the snowball tree, supposedly originated.[3] Other common names include water elder, cramp bark, snowball tree and European cranberry bush, though this plant is not closely related to the cranberry. Some botanists also include the North American species Viburnum trilobum as V. opulus var. americanum Ait., or as V. opulus subsp. trilobum (Marshall) Clausen.
29. Liguster - A privet is a flowering plant in the genus Ligustrum. The genus contains about 50 species of erect, deciduous or evergreen shrubs, sometimes forming small or medium-sized trees,[1]native to Europe, north Africa, Asia and Australasia.[2] 
 
 
 
 
 
30. Preiselbeere - Vaccinium vitis-idaea (lingonberry or cowberry) is a short evergreen shrub in the heath family that bears edible fruit, native to boreal forest and Arctic tundra throughout the Northern Hemisphere from Eurasia to North America. Lingonberries are a staple in Northern Scandinavia, picked in the wild and used to accompany a variety of dishes.[1] Commercial cultivation is undertaken in the U.S. Pacific Northwest.[2]
Vaccinium vitis-idaea is most commonly known in English as lingonberry or cowberry.[3][4][5][6] The name lingonberry originates from the Swedish name lingon for the species, and is derived from the Norse lyngr, or heather.
 
The genus name Vaccinium is a classical Latin name for a plant, possibly the bilberry or hyacinth, and may be derived from the Latin bacca, berry.[7][8] The specific name is derived from Latin vitis ("vine") and idaea, the feminine form of idaeus (literally "from Mount Ida", used in reference to raspberries Rubus idaeus).[9][10]
 
There are at least 25 other common English names of Vaccinium vitis-idaea worldwide, including:[3]
31. Schneeheide - Erica carnea (winter heath, winter flowering heather, spring heath, alpine heath; syn. E. herbacea, E. mediterranea) is a species of flowering plant in the family Ericaceae native to mountainous areas of central and southern Europe, where it grows in coniferous woodlands or stony slopes.
32. Felsenbirne - Amelanchier (/æməˈlænʃɪər/ am-ə-lan-sheer),[2] also known as shadbush, shadwood or shadblow, serviceberry or sarvisberry, or just sarvis, wild pear, juneberry, saskatoon, sugarplum or wild-plum, and chuckley pear is a genus of about 20 species of deciduous-leaved shrubs and small trees in the Rose family (Rosaceae).
33. Hundsrose - Rosa canina, commonly known as the dog-rose,[1] is a variable climbing wild rose species native to Europe, northwest Africa and western Asia.
 
It is a deciduous shrub normally ranging in height from 1–5 m, though sometimes it can scramble higher into the crowns of taller trees. Its stems are covered with small, sharp, hooked prickles, which aid it in climbing. The leaves are pinnate, with 5-7 leaflets. The flowers are usually pale pink, but can vary between a deep pink and white. They are 4–6 cm diameter with five petals, and mature into an oval 1.5–2 cm red-orange fruit, or hip.
34. Seidelbast - Daphne (/ˈdæfniː/;[1] Greek: Δάφνη, meaning "laurel") is a genus of between 50 and 95 species of deciduous and evergreen shrubs in the family Thymelaeaceae, native to Asia, Europe and north Africa. They are noted for their scented flowers and poisonous berries.
35. Sanddorn - Hippophae rhamnoides (common sea-buckthorn) is a species of flowering plant in the family Elaeagnaceae, native to fixed dunes and sea cliffs in Europe and Asia. It is a spiny deciduous shrub.
36. Berberitze - Berberis vulgaris L., also known as European barberry or simply Barberry, is a shrub in the genus Berberis. It produces edible but sharply acidic berries, which people in many countries eat as a tart and refreshing fruit.
37. Pfaffenhütchen - Euonymus europaeus (spindle, European spindle, common spindle) is a species of flowering plant in the family Celastraceae, native to much of Europe, where it inhabits the edges of forest, hedges and gentle slopes, tending to thrive on nutrient-rich, chalky and salt-poor soils. It is a deciduous shrub or small tree. Other names include fusoria, fusanum, ananbeam, shemshad rasmi (Iran), while it may have given its name to the ancient Greek settlement of Euonymeia.
38. Hartriegel - Cornus is a genus of about 30–60 species[Note 1] of woody plants in the family Cornaceae, commonly known as dogwoods, which can generally be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and distinctive bark.[1] Most are deciduous trees or shrubs, but a few species are nearly herbaceous perennial subshrubs, and a few of the woody species are evergreen. 
 
 
 
39. Rostblättrige Alpenrose - Rhododendron ferrugineum (sometimes called alpenrose, snow-rose, or rusty-leaved alpenrose) is an evergreen shrub that grows just above the tree line in the Alps, Pyrenees, Jura and northern Apennines, on acid soils. It is the type species for the Rhododendron genus. It may grow up to 1 m tall and produces clusters of pinkish-red, bell-shaped flowers throughout the summer. 
40. Ahorn - Acer /ˈeɪsər/ is a genus of trees or shrubs commonly known as maple. There are approximately 128 species, most of which are native to Asia,[2] with a number also appearing in Europe, northern Africa, and North America. Only one species, Acer laurinum, extends to the Southern Hemisphere.[3] The type species of the genus is the sycamore maple, Acer pseudoplatanus, the most common species in Europe.[4]
41. Edelkastanie - Castanea sativa or sweet chestnut is a species of flowering plant in the family Fagaceae, native to Europe and Asia Minor, and widely cultivated throughout the temperate world. A substantial, long-lived deciduous tree, it produces an edible seed, the chestnut, which has been used in cooking since ancient times.
42. Lärche - Larches are conifers in the genus Larix, in the family Pinaceae. Growing from 20 to 45 m tall (65 to 147 ft), [1] they are native to much of the cooler temperate northern hemisphere, on lowlands in the north and high on mountains further south. Larches are among the dominant plants in the immense boreal forests of Russia, Canada, and Scandinavia.
43. Zirbe - Pinus cembra, also known as Swiss pine, Swiss stone pine or Arolla pine, is a species of pine tree that grows in the Alps and Carpathian Mountains of central Europe, in Poland (Tatra Mountains), Switzerland, France, Italy, Austria, Germany, Slovenia, Slovakia (Tatra Mountains), Ukraine and Romania. It typically grows at 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) to 2,300 metres (7,500 ft) altitude. It often reaches the alpine tree line in this area. The mature size is typically between 25 metres (82 ft) and 35 metres (115 ft) in height, and the trunk diameter can be up to 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) .
44. Brombeere - The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the Rubus genus in the Rosaceae family, hybrids among these species within the Rubus subgenus, and hybrids between the Rubus and Idaeobatus subgenera. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregate. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.[1]
45. Himbeere - Rubus idaeus (raspberry, also called red raspberry or occasionally as European raspberry to distinguish it from other raspberries) is a red-fruited species of Rubus native to Europe and northern Asia and commonly cultivated in other temperate regions.[1][2]
46. Heidelbeere - Vaccinium myrtillus is a species of shrub with edible fruit of blue color, commonly called "bilberry", "whortleberry" or European blueberry.[1] It has much in common with the American blueberry (Vaccinium cyanococcus). It is more precisely called common bilberry or blue whortleberry, to distinguish it from other Vaccinium relatives. Regional names include blaeberry, hurtleberry,[2] huckleberry, winberry[3] and fraughan.[4]
47 Stachelbeere - The gooseberry (/ˈɡuːsbɛri/ or /ˈɡuːzbɛri/ (American) or /ˈɡʊzbəri/ (British)),[2] with scientific names Ribes uva-crispa (and syn. Ribes grossularia), is a species of Ribes (which also includes the currants).
It is native to Europe, northwestern Africa, west, south and southeast Asia. Gooseberry bushes produce an edible fruit and are grown on both a commercial and domestic basis.
48. Walderdbeere - Fragaria vesca, commonly called wild strawberry, woodland strawberry, Alpine strawberry, European strawberry, or fraise des bois, is a perennial herbaceous plant that grows naturally throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere, and that produces edible fruits.
49. Hanf – Hemp (from Old English hænep) is a commonly used term for high-growing varieties of the Cannabis plant and its products, which include fiber, oil, and seed. Hemp is refined into products such as hemp seed foods, hemp oil, wax, resin, rope, cloth, pulp, paper, and fuel.
 
30.05.2015 – Bäume & Sträucher ++ Deutsch – Englisch ++ by Michael Maurer ++
 mit freundlicher Unterstützung von Wikipedia 

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